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The Pig that Wants to Be Eaten: And 99+ Other Thought Experiments

Availability: In Stock
ISBN: 9781803510477
AuthorBaggini, Julian
Pub Date01/02/2024
BindingPaperback
CountryGBR
Dewey101
Quick overview A collection of short, accessible philosophical quandaries to stimulate, challenge and entertain.
€12.77

'Baggini offers us a tempting smorgasbord of some of the most baffling, weird and occasionally downright creepy scenarios ever envisaged... enjoy these mind-boggling tales from the outer limit of thought' Guardian

Is it right to eat a pig that wants to be eaten?
Are you really reading this book cover, or are you in a simulation?
If God is all-powerful, could he create a square circle?

Here are 100 of the most intriguing thought experiments from the history of philosophy and ideas - questions to leave you inspired, informed and scratching your head, dumbfounded.

A collection of short, accessible philosophical quandaries to stimulate, challenge and entertain.

'This book is like the Sudoku of moral philosophy: apply your mind to any of its "thought experiments" while stuck on the Tube, and quickly be transported out of rush-hour hell' New Statesman

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Product description

'Baggini offers us a tempting smorgasbord of some of the most baffling, weird and occasionally downright creepy scenarios ever envisaged... enjoy these mind-boggling tales from the outer limit of thought' Guardian

Is it right to eat a pig that wants to be eaten?
Are you really reading this book cover, or are you in a simulation?
If God is all-powerful, could he create a square circle?

Here are 100 of the most intriguing thought experiments from the history of philosophy and ideas - questions to leave you inspired, informed and scratching your head, dumbfounded.

A collection of short, accessible philosophical quandaries to stimulate, challenge and entertain.

'This book is like the Sudoku of moral philosophy: apply your mind to any of its "thought experiments" while stuck on the Tube, and quickly be transported out of rush-hour hell' New Statesman